Thursday, April 17, 2014

Tutorial by VioletsBuds: Ruched Zinnia Flower

I'm amazed by how pretty VioletsBuds' creations are. She makes beautiful handmade accessories and home decors. Her flowers are simply adorable! They are beautifully made and her design is fabulous.

Want to learn how to make a runched Zinnia flower? Well, Melanie from VioletsBuds generously shares a tutorial on how to make one.


The Zinnia Ribbon flower is one of my favorites, but I don't make it very often. It can be quite time consuming, but it makes a fun, unique flower. I find it easiest to use a 7/8" or 1" wide ribbon, but other sizes can be used as well.



Starting at the bottom corner, make a running stitch at a 45*   angle. Count the number of stitches it takes to make the first pass. (I like to use an even number). You will want to use the same number of stitches for each pass so that your petals all look even.



Once you get to the edge, make a 90* turn and stitch to the   next edge. (If  you like, you can draw lines at 90* angles down the strip (zig zag). I   skipped this step and just eyeballed the angle while I stitched.) After making a few passes you can start pulling the thread taut and make the ruched petals.









When your ruched ribbon is as long as you want it, knot & cut the thread. Next, start curling the ribbon in a circle to form a flower. You can secure it with thread, sewing it in place. Or, you can use a hot glue gun to glue the flower down to a piece of felt.







The finished flower should look like this. It can be attached to a headband or clip to wear as a hair accessory, or put on a lapel pin, or to adorn a handbag. I used a blue zinnia in this hair fascinator and love the added texture it brings.


April Showers fascinator

If you make a ruched ribbon zinnia, we would love to see your work! Let us know what you think of the tutorial too.

6 comments:

  1. Years ago I was in a quilting guild which made ruched zinnias from fabric for winners ribbons at a quilt show. The ribbons were beautiful, and I was thrilled to receive one! Thanks for sharing the technique.

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  2. So that's how they make those lovely fllowers. I'm bookmarking this page for later!

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  3. Who knew it could be done so quickly and cleverly? I surely did not. I am all thumbs when it comes to ribbons and bows! Thanks for the tute!

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  4. How lovely! Like Nancy, I'm going to bookmark this for future reference. Thanks to Nat and Melanie!

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